Archive

Archive for January, 2012

Arnside Viaduct and Seafood Kitchen

Arnside Viaduct, 1856 (restored 2011)

Happy New Year; all the best for 2012. It seems like quite a while since I’ve written anything online. Hopefully the New Year will provide more time for me to write architectural insights.

My course in MA (Hons) Architectural Design includes the opportunity for a placement period. As such, I am currently looking for work experience at an architecture firm or similar in a period from January-December 2012. Anyone interested can read my CV and view portfolio material at http://issuu.com/rob_hebblethwaite. Stay posted for a new website, on its way very shortly.

Arnside Viaduct, built in 1856, has recently undergone a £11.1 million deck refurbishment. The crossing is part of the Cumbria West Coast Line, linking Carnforth, Barrow and Carlisle. Over time, the structure had become so weak that trains were limited to 30 mph when crossing. In the final four months, this was reduced to 20 mph. In addition, the structure had become too weak to accommodate the lifting cranes required for dismantling. May Gurney, building contractors, were required to replace 102 deck units (two for each of the 51 spans) in a 16 week time period. By installing two new maintenance walkways, independent from the existing bridge deck, they could use a gantry frame to replace the panels. This technique, first trialled at the nearby Leven Viaduct in 2006, purportedly cut construction time by a half. Hopefully, Network Rail will now increase the viaduct speed limit to 60 mph. Certainly, the renewal works have ensured the future of this 150 year old structure.

Over the Christmas break, I compiled a portfolio of third year work. The ‘Explorations’ project seeked to design a sustainable prawn fishing community on the island of Kerrera, Scotland. Analysing the creel fishing process and undertaking a site visit established themes of wave turbulence, micro-climate and weather. The Seafood Kitchen provides fine dining, culinary education and guest accommodation to gastro-tourists wanting to learn more about the prawn fishing industry. My final design is a restaurant that incorporates thermal strategies based on the heat processes involved in seafood preparation.